ADHD

They say a cluttered desk is a sign of a cluttered mind. What then is an empty desk a sign of? ― Albert Einstein

I believe at times the seriousness of the neurodevelopmental disorder that is Attention Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) is often minimized as though everyone has it which just is not true. Yes, we all have our occassional moments where we are scattered, forgetful, disorganized, late for work or absent minded and those moments shouldn’t be confused with actually having the diagnosis of ADHD. ADHD if untreated can and will interfere will daily life and activities of both children and adults. Let us dive a little deeper into the signs and symptoms of ADHD so we can better recognize when we should seek further help and support.

It is normal for children to have trouble focusing and behaving at one time or another. However, children with ADHD do not just grow out of these behaviors. The symptoms continue, can be severe, and can cause difficulty at school, at home, or with friends.

A child with ADHD might:

  • daydream a lot
  • forget or lose things a lot
  • squirm or fidget
  • talk too much
  • make careless mistakes or take unnecessary risks
  • have a hard time resisting temptation
  • have trouble taking turns
  • have difficulty getting along with others

Types

There are three different types of ADHD, depending on which types of symptoms are strongest in the individual:

Predominantly Inattentive Presentation: It is hard for the individual to organize or finish a task, to pay attention to details, or to follow instructions or conversations. The person is easily distracted or forgets details of daily routines.

Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Presentation: The person fidgets and talks a lot. It is hard to sit still for long (e.g., for a meal or while doing homework). Smaller children may run, jump or climb constantly. The individual feels restless and has trouble with impulsivity. Someone who is impulsive may interrupt others a lot, grab things from people, or speak at inappropriate times. It is hard for the person to wait their turn or listen to directions. A person with impulsiveness may have more accidents and injuries than others.

Combined Presentation: Symptoms of the above two types are equally present in the person.

Clinton is predominantly inattentive and I feel as he has gotten older he has gained a certain personal awareness of the inattentive part of himself. While he does struggle staying on task, organizing himself, following instructions and is often easily distracted we continue to strive to find ways to help him and more importantly help him help himself in age appropriate ways. Medication is personal choice between parent, doctor and child that being said Clinton does take medication and I do not feel it is something to be ashamed of or looked down apon. Clinton is not forced, is always included in the discussion about medication and he knows at any time if he does not want to take it he does not have to. I bring up medication because it is something that is used to treat the symptoms of ADHD and I believe it is important to keep an open dialogue about it.

Medication can help children manage their ADHD symptoms in their everyday life and can help them control the behaviors that cause difficulties with family, friends, and at school. Medications can affect children differently and can have side effects such as decreased appetite or sleep problems. One child may respond well to one medication, but not to another. It took us a couple different tries with different medications to find the right fit for my son, but I believe it was worth it as Clinton has voiced how Ritalin LA helps him especially through his school day.

  • Stimulants are the best-known and most widely used ADHD medications. Between 70-80% of children with ADHD have fewer ADHD symptoms when taking these fast-acting medications.
  • Nonstimulants were approved for the treatment of ADHD in 2003. They do not work as quickly as stimulants, but their effect can last up to 24 hours.

Tips for Parents

The following are suggestions that may help:

  • Create a routine. Try to follow the same schedule every day, from wake-up time to bedtime.
  • Get organizedexternal icon. Encourage your child to put schoolbags, clothing, and toys in the same place every day so that they will be less likely to lose them.
  • Manage distractions. Turn off the TV, limit noise, and provide a clean workspace when your child is doing homework. Some children with ADHD learn well if they are moving or listening to background music. Watch your child and see what works.
  • Limit choices. To help your child not feel overwhelmed or overstimulated, offer choices with only a few options. For example, have them choose between this outfit or that one, this meal or that one, or this toy or that one.
  • Be clear and specific when you talk with your child. Let your child know you are listening by describing what you heard them say. Use clear, brief directions when they need to do something.
  • Help your child plan. Break down complicated tasks into simpler, shorter steps. For long tasks, starting early and taking breaks may help limit stress.
  • Use goals and praise or other rewards. Use a chart to list goals and track positive behaviors, then let your child know they have done well by telling them or by rewarding their efforts in other ways. Be sure the goals are realistic—small steps are important!
  • Create positive opportunities. Children with ADHD may find certain situations stressful. Finding out and encouraging what your child does well—whether it’s school, sports, art, music, or play—can help create positive experiences.
  • Provide a healthy lifestyle. Nutritious food, lots of physical activity, and sufficient sleep are important; they can help keep ADHD symptoms from getting worse.
  • Meditation: At its most basic, meditation gives young children the feeling of being quiet and still. It gives them time to breathe and imagine, and lets them know that it is okay to have feelings. In fact, through meditation children learn that it is okay to be whoever they are and feel whatever they feel. I have found that meditation is very beneficial especially in Clintons sleep routine and not only that its a great time for us to relax and unwind together. There are numerous free childrens meditations on YouTube, Spotify, Pandora or my favorite Insight Timer

Further Resources and Support

American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP)

Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

Learning Disabilities Association of America (LDA)

Parent Advocacy Coalition for Educational Rights (PACER)

National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH)

This is by no means a comprehensive look into ADHD and I am by no means an expert on the issue I am merely a mom hoping to help others and I hope you have read or found something here that helps you.